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AACC Remembers Past President Dr. Norbert W. Tietz

Norbert W. Tietz, PhD, an AACC member since 1955 and a major influence on the practice of clinical chemistry, passed away on May 23, 2018 at the age of 91.

Among Dr. Tietz’s many contributions to the field, he is best known for writing “Fundamentals of Clinical Chemistry” and editing “Textbook of Clinical Chemistry,” both of which continue to serve as foundational information sources on laboratory medicine for both students and educators. Now in its seventh edition, “Fundamentals” was the first modern textbook that integrated clinical chemistry with the basic sciences and pathophysiology. “Textbook of Clinical Chemistry” is now in its sixth edition and bridges the gap between the clinical laboratory and medical management by relating pathophysiology to analytical results in health and disease. Beyond his seminal work on these texts, Dr. Tietz further shaped laboratory medicine education by starting the first U.S. clinical chemistry Master of Science program in the late 1960s. This program was later expanded to become one of the first PhD programs on the subject.

In addition to these accomplishments, Dr. Tietz served as AACC president in 1977 and was a professor of pathology and director of clinical chemistry at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington. Upon retiring, he became an adjunct professor in the department of pathology of the University of California, San Diego. He also previously held positions and appointments at several Chicago area institutions, including the Mount Sinai Hospital Medical Center, Chicago Medical School/University of Health Sciences, and Rush Medical College.

AACC honored Dr. Tietz in 1976 with the Outstanding Contributions in Education Award, in 1989 with the Outstanding Contributions to Clinical Chemistry Award, and again in 1995 with the Professor Alvin Dubin Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Profession and the Academy. He will be deeply missed for his tireless dedication to advancing laboratory medicine and patient care and for his friendship to colleagues.