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Issue

Thursday, December 17, 2020


In The News


Clinical literature and commentary point to a new protocol for evaluating fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and how well this modality flags colorectal cancer (CRC). Collectively, two studies found that FIT performs poorly in identifying early-stage CRC but serves some benefit as a periodic screening tool. This research provides “additional valuable…
Societal factors rather than genetics might drive disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes among individuals who self-identify as Black. A study in JAMA Cardiology found no significant associations between West African ancestry and blood pressure (BP), kidney function, and left ventricular mass changes in response to antihypertensive therapy. While the…
A technology innovation contest held by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) aims to bring COVID-19 diagnostic tests to market with built-in, automated, harmonized data capture and wireless transmission capabilities. On December 15, HHS chose XX winners from a pool of 31 applicants that will advance their…

AACC Alert


A new statistical model based on estimates of within-subject biological variation, analytical variation, and previous test results simplifies the process for clinical labs to report personalized reference intervals. Investigators detailed their findings in Clinical Chemistry.

Practice Management


A Google team’s discovery—that underspecification compromises success in machine-learning models—underscores potential flaws in the way scientists train artificial intelligence systems. “The process used to build most machine-learning models today cannot tell which models will work in the real world and which ones won’t,” wrote Will Douglas Heaven in a commentary…

World View


A global initiative by the World Health Organization (WHO) outlines three targets to end cervical cancer through vaccination, testing, and treatment protocols. This includes a goal to get 70% of women screened by 2030, using a high-performance test by 35 years of age and again by 45 years of age.…