American Association for Clinical Chemistry
Better health through laboratory medicine
August 2008 Clinical Chemistry News: Industry Profiles

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August 2008: Volume 34, Number 8


  Hologic Scoops Up Third Wave Technologies


Hologic announced a $580 million deal to acquire Third Wave Technologies, a developer of molecular diagnostic reagents for a wide variety of DNA and RNA analysis applications based on its proprietary Invader chemistry system. Third Wave recently submitted HPV tests for FDA approval, and Hologic said it believes the global market for HPV testing will increase to $800 million in the next few years. “The combination of Hologic and Third Wave brings together two great companies that employ complementary technologies but share a common mission: to help save the lives of women,” said Jack Cumming, Hologic’s CEO.

“Hologic is an established, diversified provider of diagnostic products and therapeutic devices. Third Wave’s products in development, including its HPV tests, employ a patented molecular diagnostic platform designed to help identify cervical cancer and other diseases at an early stage.” Cumming also noted that Hologic has an established sales and distribution network for women’s health, as well as extensive relationships with clinical labs and OB/GYNs.


Qiagen Gets Real-Time PCR Portfolio With Corbett Acquisition


Qiagen announced a deal worth up to $135 million to acquire Corbett Life Science, a privately held developer, manufacturer, and distributor of life sciences instrumentation, headquartered in Sydney, Australia. Corbett is known for developing the world’s first rotary, real-time PCR cycler system, used to detect real-time PCR reactions that make specific sequences of DNA and RNA targets visible. “We are pleased to offer our customers the choice of superior platform of technologies for the entire workflow process—from sample to result,” said Peer Schatz, CEO of Qiagen. “Corbett technologies are excellent complements to our portfolio of current and future molecular testing solutions. We expect this transaction to contribute significantly to our leading positions in molecular diagnostics, applied testing, pharmaceutical and clinical research, as well as academic research.”



                         Micronics Receives NIH Grant for Rapid HIV POC Test


Micronics announced it received a $100,000 Small Business Innovation Research grant to develop its rapid, POC diagnostic test for HIV. The Micronics test system will use a droplet of blood and small, disposable cassettes that contain all necessary reagents and control to perform a nucleic acid assay. “The overall objective of the NIH grant is to determine whether our test can provide the same kind of information as the current nucleic acid test in use today,” said Karen Hedine, CEO of Micronics. “If this can be proven, we believe that our application will offer significant human health benefits, given the fact that it can be performed at reduced cost and in minutes in a doctor’s office, public health lab, remote field hospital, or hospital birthing center.” Hedine noted that current POC antibody-based tests for HIV cannot determine the infectious status of a newborn child for as long as 18 months, due to the presence of maternal antibodies.



           Gentag, MacroArray Technologies Collaborate on Cell Phone PSA Test


Micronics announced it received a $100,000 Small Business Innovation Research grant to develop its rapid, POC diagnostic test for HIV. The Micronics test system will use a droplet of blood and small, disposable cassettes that contain all necessary reagents and control to perform a nucleic acid assay. “The overall objective of the NIH grant is to determine whether our test can provide the same kind of information as the current nucleic acid test in use today,” said Karen Hedine, CEO of Micronics. “If this can be proven, we believe that our application will offer significant human health benefits, given the fact that it can be performed at reduced cost and in minutes in a doctor’s office, public health lab, remote field hospital, or hospital birthing center.” Hedine noted that current POC antibody-based tests for HIV cannot determine the infectious status of a newborn child for as long as 18 months, due to the presence of maternal antibodies.