American Association for Clinical Chemistry
Better health through laboratory medicine
Cutting Edge Webcasts – Cancer Biomarkers
Cutting Edge Technologies Webcast Series
Program Available from May 1, 2013 through December 31, 2016
 

Intended Audience
This program is intended for clinical pathologists, laboratory physicians, laboratory directors and managers; oncologists; industry professionals and others involved in cancer testing technologies and their clinical applications for improved patient diagnosis, treatment. and outcomes.

 

Viable Circulating Tumor Cells from Patient Blood: A Chip-free Approach for Clinical Labs (originally presented January 8, 2013)
Michael King, PhD, Cornell University Center, Ithaca, NY

Dr. King discusses the use of nucleic acid technologies to detect circulating tumor cells shed in the bloodstream from primary and metastatic cancers, and how they can be used noninvasively to measure the evolution of tumor genotypes.

 

New Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening (originally presented February 12, 2013)
Callum Fraser, PhD, University of Dundee Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, Scotland

Dr. Fraser discusses new guidelines for colorectal cancer screening which recommend the replacement of traditional guaiac fecal occult blood tests with new tests, particularly high sensitivity fecal immunochemical tests for hemoglobin.

 

Advances in Prostate Cancer Detection: What's Next for Clinical Labs? (originally presented March 12, 2013)
William Catalona, MD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL

Dr. Catalona presents compelling results from recent studies of using novel biomarkers to improve screening for prostate cancer.

 

Learning Outcomes

Viable Circulating Tumor Cells from Patient Blood: A Chip-free Approach for Clinical Labs
After viewing this presentation, you should be able to:

  • Describe approaches currently being used to isolate circulating tumor cells (CTCs).
  • Devise strategies for overcoming the limitations of existing CTC detection technologies.
  • Explain what the isolation of CTCs could mean for clinical research and the future of cancer therapy.
  • Assess the possibility of implementing this new cancer detection technology in one’s lab.

New Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening
After viewing this presentation, you should be able to:

  • Explain the new recommendations on screening modalities for colorectal cancer.
  • Develop a plan for discontinuing traditional guaiac-based fecal occult blood testing and replacing with new fecal immunochemical testing.
  • Support and promote the importance of automated quantitation of fecal hemoglobin concentration in screening for colorectal cancer.

Advances in Prostate Cancer Detection: What’s Next for Clinical Labs?
After viewing this presentation, you should be able to:

  • Describe the pros and cons of various FDA-cleared laboratory assays for detection of prostate cancer.
  • Recommend current best practices (both laboratory and clinical) for detecting prostate cancer in individuals suspected of having the disease.
  • Evaluate the potential advantages of using multi-analyte panels to help detect prostate cancer.
  • Devise a diagnostic strategy for improving testing capabilities for detecting prostate cancer.

To register for this program, click here.



faqs
Register