American Association for Clinical Chemistry
Better health through laboratory medicine
Rosalyn S. Yalow, PhD
1978 AACC Lectureship Award

Nobel Prize winner Rosalyn Yalow addressed a packed house. Yalow is the closest clinical chemistry per se has come to the Prize (she received an AACC Award in 1975), and, as Piel pointed out, the first winner whose work was done after the “federalization” of research began in earnest.

1975 Outstanding Contributions in a Selected Area of Research

Rosalyn S. Yalow will receive the third AACC Award for Outstanding Contributions to Clinical Chemistry in a Selected Area: the application of radioactive-tagged substances to medicine, particularly in the development of radioimmunoassay and its application to endocrinology. The award is sponsored by the Boehringer Mannheim Corporation.

Dr. Yalow, a native New Yorker, obtained her A.B. from Hunter College, and the M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, from which she also received an honorary D.Sc. in 1974. Her bibliography contains over 250 publications, including about 45 book chapters. Most of these deal with the application of radioisotopes to medicine and physiology, covering subjects as diverse as thyroid physiology, measurement of blood volume, kinetics of distribution and metabolism of radioiodine-labeled serum proteins, radiation-induced alterations of peptides and proteins, and the demonstration of the antigenicity of insulin in man that culminated in the development of the radioimmunoassay technique and its application to many aspects of endocrinology and, more recently, to studies of the heterogeneity of peptide hormones in plasma and tissue.

Dr. Yalow joined the Radioisotope Service at the Bronx Veterans Administration Hospital at its inception in 1974 and is currently Chief of its Nuclear Medicine Service as well as Senior Medical Investigator of the Veterans Administration and Distinguished Service Professor at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Besides her membership in numerous scientific societies she serves on the Council of the Endocrine Society, the Board of Scientific Counselors of the NIAMDD of the National Institutes of Health, the Board of Visitors of the University of Pittsburgh, and many other advisory groups.

Dr. Yalow has received more than a dozen awards, including the Van Slyke Award of the N. Y. Section of the AACC in 1968, the Anachem Award of the Detroit Association of Analytical Chemists in 1973, the Koch Award of the Endocrine Society in 1972, the Gairdner Foundation International Award in 1971, and the Eli Lilly Award of the American Diabetes Association in 1961. She has held many Distinguished Lectureships.