Peter Wilding, PhD, FACB
2009 Edwin F. Ullman Award

Dr. Wilding is professor emeritus in the department of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center in Philadelphia, where he was director of clinical chemistry from 1986 to 2002. He has held many offices in local, national, and international organizations associated with laboratory medicine, including that of president of the AACC. His early research involved the description and characterization of the first case of “macro-amylasemia” and led to worldwide studies of macroenzymes. For the past 20 years, he has concentrated on the creation of new technology involving microfabricated devices now known as microchips for clinical analyses. This work resulted in 20 patents. The microdevices facilitate cell isolation, DNA amplification, microfluidic control, sample preparation, and sperm analysis. Dr. Wilding conducted much of this in collaboration with his colleague Dr. Larry Kricka. The many awards he has received include the Annual Lectureship Award of the Canadian Association of Medical Biochemists, the Kone Award of the Association of Clinical Biochemists, the Roman Lectureship of the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemistry, and the Van Slyke Award of the New York Metro Section of the AACC. He has over 150 publications in journals, editorials, books, and book chapters and has held numerous editorial board appointments. He has served as an adviser or consultant to the U.K. Department of Health, World Health Organization, International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and National Academy of Sciences.

2001 Outstanding Contributions to Clinical Chemistry

Peter Wilding, PhD, FACB, received his Bachelor of Science with Honors in Medical Biochemistry in 1961 and his PhD in Clinical Chemistry in 1965, both from the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. His PhD thesis described and characterized the first case of “macro-amylasemia” and led to worldwide studies on macroenzymes. From 1965 to 1967, he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, CA. In 1967, he returned to the United Kingdom to gain further training in clinical chemistry at the Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre, Birmingham, England. From 1969 to 1972, he was Director of Pathology at the BUPA Medical Centre in London, following which he returned to Birmingham as Deputy Director of the Wolfson Research Laboratories at the University of Birmingham, where he served until he emigrated to the United States in 1977. During this period his research concentrated on the characterization of serum enzymes and the development of diagnostic methods and instruments.

From 1977 to 1982, Dr. Wilding worked with the Technicon Corporation in Tarrytown, NY as a Director of Programs and subsequently as a Vice President in the Diagnostic Systems Division. In 1982, he moved to the SmithKline Beckman Corporation in Philadelphia as a Vice President of Research and Development for their Geometric Data Division. During this period, he published additional work on diagnostic methods.

Since 1986, he has been Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Director of Clinical Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA. In this capacity he has performed functions as a clinical laboratory director, teacher, and researcher. His work has been funded by the National Cancer Institutes and industry. The research has concentrated on the development of methods for detecting malignancy and the creation of a new technology involving microfabricated devices (“microchips”) for clinical analyses. This new analytical technology program has produced a series of patents and numerous publications in leading journals. This technology program has also led Dr. Wilding to play an active role in technology transfer at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Wilding has served on numerous committees relating to clinical laboratory science in the United Kingdom and the United States. These committees have included several offices in AACC, including the Executive Committees of the New York Metro and Philadelphia Sections, membership of the Oak Ridge Conference Committee, Chair of the Clinical Associations Committee, membership and Chair of the Meetings Management Group, and membership of the Commission on Education and Science. He chaired the Organizing Committees for the 1991 CliniChem Meeting in Philadelphia and the 1993 National Meeting in New York City. In 1991, Dr. Wilding was elected to the Board of Directors and served as President of the Association in 1995. In addition, he served on the Finance Committee of the association and several Task Forces established by AACC.

At the international level, Dr. Wilding has been a consultant to the World Health Organization, which involved travel and lectures in several parts of the world. He was responsible for preparing the first WHO guide to laboratories operating in developing countries. He served on Expert Panels or Committees of the International Federation for Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) dealing with Reference Values, Diagnostic Products, and Analytical Quality. In addition, he served as a member and Chairman of the Education and Management Division of IFCC. He is also an Honorary Professor of the West China University of Medical Sciences in Chengdu, China.

In 1993, he received the Kone Award of the Association of Clinical Biochemists (United Kingdom) for his contributions to the field of clinical chemistry. In addition, he was awarded three Outstanding Speaker Awards by AACC and the 1989 Annual Lectureship Award of the Canadian Association of Medical Biochemists. In 1997, he was awarded Honorary Membership of the Association of Clinical Biochemists (United Kingdom) and the Roman Lectureship of the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemistry.

Dr. Wilding is a Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists (United Kingdom), the Royal Society of Chemistry (United Kingdom), and the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry. He is certified by the American Board of Bioanalysis as a High Complexity Clinical Laboratory Director.

1995 AACC Past President’s Award

Peter Wilding received his B.Sc. with Honors in medical biochemistry in 1961 and his Ph.D. in clinical chemistry in 1965, both from the University of Birmingham, UK. His Ph.D. thesis described and characterized the first case of “Macro-Amylasemia” and led to worldwide studies on macro-enzymes. From 1965 to 1967 he was an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, CA. In 1967 he returned to the UK to gain further training in clinical chemistry at the Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre, Birmingham, England. From 1969 to 1972, he was director of pathology at the BUPA Medical Centre in London, after which he returned to Birmingham as deputy director of the Wolfson Research Laboratories at the University of Birmingham, where he served until he came to the US in 1977. During this period his research concentrated on the characterization of serum enzymes and the development of diagnostic methods and instruments.

From 1977 to 1982 he worked with the Technicon Corporation in Tarrytown, NY, as a director of programs and subsequently as a vice president in the Diagnostic Systems Division. In 1982 he moved to the SmithKline Beckman Corporation in Philadelphia as vice president of research and development for their Geometric Data Division. During this period he published further work on diagnostic methods.

Since 1986 he has been professor of pathology and laboratory medicine and director of clinical chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA. In this capacity he has performed as a clinical laboratory director, teacher, and researcher. His work has been funded by the National Cancer Institutes and by industry. The research has concentrated on the development of methods for detecting malignancy and the creation of a new technology involving micro-fabricated devices (“microchips”) for clinical analyses. This new analytical technology program has resulted in a series of patents and numerous publications in leading journals.

Wilding has served on numerous committees in the UK and the US relating to clinical laboratory science. These include several offices in AACC including the executive committees of the New York Metro and Philadelphia sections, member of the Oak Ridge Conference Committee, chair of the Clinical Associations Committee, member and chair of the Meetings Management Group, and member of the Commission on Education and Science. He chaired the organizing committees for the 1991 CliniChem Meeting in Philadelphia and the 1993 National Meeting in New York City.

In 1991 he was elected to the Board of Directors, and in 1995 he served as President of the Association. In addition he has served on the Finance Committee of the Association and the Strategic Analysis Task Force established by President Basil Doumas in 1992.

At the international level, Wilding has been a consultant to the World Health Organization (WHO), which has involved travel and lectures in several parts of the world, and was responsible for preparing the first WHO guide to laboratories operating in developing countries. He has served on two expert panels of the International Federation for Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) dealing with Reference Values and Diagnostic Products and currently serves on the IFCC Committee for Analytical Quality. In addition, he is vice Chairman of the Education and Management Division of IFCC.

In 1993, he received the Kone Award of the Association of Clinical Biochemists (UK) for his contributions to the field of clinical chemistry. Furthermore he has been awarded three Outstanding Speaker Awards by AACC and the 1989 Annual Lectureship Award of the Canadian Association of Medical Biochemists.

He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, UK, and is certified by NRCC and the American Board of Bioanalysis as a High Complexity Clinical Laboratory Director.

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