American Association for Clinical Chemistry
Better health through laboratory medicine
Christopher P. Price
2009 Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine

Dr. Price is an independent consultant focused on outcomes research and a visiting professor in clinical biochemistry at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. He is also clinical director of the Cumbria and Lancashire Pathology Commissioning Network. His past positions include professor of clinical biochemistry, head of clinical biochemistry, and director of pathology at the St. Batholomew’s and Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry. He has been active in a number of organizations in the United States and the United Kingdom, including serving on the AACC board of directors and the Oak Ridge conference and Annual Meeting organizing committees. He served as president of the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and chaired the organizing committee for a congress of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. He is an adviser to the chief medical officer in the United Kingdom and was a member of an Independent Review of Pathology Services in England. Dr. Price’s research group developed the first commercial enzymatic methods for acetaminophen, salicylate, and phenylalanine. His group also developed rapid light-scattering immunoassays, explored biosensor technology, and developed a range of specific protein assays, including the first automated immunoassays for cystatin C. His research has resulted in many peer-reviewed publications, and he has collaborated on a number of acclaimed books on immunoassay techniques, point-of-care testing, and evidence-based laboratory medicine.

2006 Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine

Dr. Price is an independent consultant focused on outcomes research and a visiting professor in clinical biochemistry at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. He is also clinical director of the Cumbria and Lancashire Pathology Commissioning Network. His past positions include professor of clinical biochemistry, head of clinical biochemistry, and director of pathology at the St. Batholomew’s and Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry. He has been active in a number of organizations in the United States and the United Kingdom, including serving on the AACC board of directors and the Oak Ridge conference and Annual Meeting organizing committees. He served as president of the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and chaired the organizing committee for a congress of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. He is an adviser to the chief medical officer in the United Kingdom and was a member of an Independent Review of Pathology Services in England. Dr. Price’s research group developed the first commercial enzymatic methods for acetaminophen, salicylate, and phenylalanine. His group also developed rapid light-scattering immunoassays, explored biosensor technology, and developed a range of specific protein assays, including the first automated immunoassays for cystatin C. His research has resulted in many peer-reviewed publications, and he has collaborated on a number of acclaimed books on immunoassay techniques, point-of-care testing, and evidence-based laboratory medicine.

1998 Outstanding Contributions in Education

Christopher P. Price, PhD, will receive the 28th annual award, sponsored by SmithKline Beecham Clinical Laboratories. He offers the following biographical sketch.

I graduated as an external student of the University of London in 1967, with a degree in Chemistry and Physiology. I began my training as a clinical biochemist in Coventry while also studying for a PhD at the University of Birmingham, England. I attained my PhD in 1972; my research was on the nature of the alkaline phosphatase of bile. I moved to Birmingham in 1972 and completed my training, with the award of the Mastership in Clinical Biochemistry in 1973.

I moved to Southampton as Consultant Clinical Biochemist in 1976 and then to a similar position at Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, in 1980.In 1988, I became Professor of Clinical Biochemistry at the London Hospital Medical College, which merged and became the St. Bartholomew’s and Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry in 1995.I am currently also Director of Pathology for the Royal Hospitals NHS Trust.I was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry in 1982 and Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists in 1989.

I have been fortunate all of my professional life to work in large teaching hospitals with many dedicated and enthusiastic colleagues.This environment has provided a unique and stimulating environment in which to observe the clinical problems that grow into research topics, also providing from time to time the fulfillment of achieving solutions to some of these problems.

My research interests span both basic and applied fields, predominantly in the fields of enzymology, bone disease, immunoassay technology, point-of-care testing, and lately, evidence-based laboratory medicine.My interest in novel bacterial enzymes led to the development of the first enzyme-mediated assay for paracetamol (acetaminophen), which is now used throughout the world.In the field of immunoassay, I have enhanced our understanding of the principles of light scattering techniques. I have published >200 peer-reviewed scientific papers, 40 review, and 5 books, and hold 7 patents.My book, Principles and Practice of Immunoassay, now in its second edition, is the market leader in its field, providing a foundation of teaching for anybody working with immunoassay technology.

I am a past-Chairman of the Association of Clinical Biochemists and of its Education Committee.In the former position, I initiated the program to develop multimedia teaching in clinical biochemistry, the first two CD ROM products being a success for the Association throughout the world.In the latter position, I established the foundation of the current training programs for clinical biochemists in the United Kingdom; this has provided an opportunity to understand more clearly the learning objectives and competencies required of scientists practicing at the interface between the laboratory and clinical environment.I have continued this interest, campaigning for the statutory registration of clinical biochemists in the United Kingdom.

I have worked closely with clinical biochemists throughout the world, being a member of the Scientific Division of IFCC for 6 years.I was the chairman of the organizing committee of the 16th IFCC Congress in London in 1996. I have been a member of AACC for 18 years and have attended the national meeting for the past 14 years.I have enjoyed the friendship of many US colleagues over these years, and my professional career has been enhanced by the stimulus of the US culture.I have been a member of the Editorial Board of Clinical Chemistry for 3 years and of the Oak Ridge Organizing Committee for 2 years.